shotarokaneda:

idk how phineas and ferb managed to have the exact same plotline every episode and also end up as one of the best animated shows of the past decade

Pinky and the Brain, anyone?

(via neilnevins)


vivi-shiba:

buttsauce-vakarian:

i feel like wearing black lately ┐(‘~`;)┌

i feel like wearing u, u get me


ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio

Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).

(via fishingboatproceeds)




(via stripperina)


winkbooks:

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter — Notes from the Zombie Apocalypse

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter
by Lost Zombies
Chronicle
2011, 160 pages, 8 x 10 x 0.5 inches
$15 Buy a copy on Amazon

Some of my favorite things about zombie movies are the details of the changed world. The dead grass, broken windows, toppled telephone poles, abandoned cars with missing wheels and trunks left open, boarded-up buildings, spent ammo shells, and other signs of struggle and desperation serve to create a fascinatingly creepy environment.

And that’s why I like Dead Inside: Do Not Enter so much. The book consists entirely of letters, hand-written warnings, and pages torn from journal entries that were written during the zombie pandemic. The notes are on matchbooks, napkins, photographs, advertisements, shopping lists, road maps, scraps of cardboard, and gum wrappers. Some of the notes are written with pen and pencil, others are written with lipstick, burnt wood, crayons, and blood.

The messages of the notes themselves tell the tale of the rise of the zombie pandemic, from tentative, joking questions about a “really bad flu,” escalating to confused panic, and later to grim acceptance of the new reality that the survivors now must live in.

In the introduction to Dead Inside, we learn that these notes had been found in a Dora the Explorer backpack. The first note presented in the book was written by the man who killed the owner of the backpack, a girl who was about 10 years old and had been bitten by a zombie (but had not yet turned into one). The man wrote “I opened her backpack and found all these notes and letters. This stuff is poisonous. No one in their right mind should read it. Reading this is like looking into the sun.” – Mark Frauenfelder

September 16, 2014

(via catmerch)


c3pmeow:

cred: http://jakecarter14.imgur.com/

HOLYCRAP

(via oblivious-much)


lemondemolition:

autobahnvismarck:


perstephsanscouronne:

becausebirds:

Our visitor sure is enthusiastic!

This is all about the llama staring at you meaningfully through the rearview mirror.

The ostrich is just a distraction for the murder that llama will perform


Carl

His tummy has the rumblies.

lemondemolition:

autobahnvismarck:

perstephsanscouronne:

becausebirds:

Our visitor sure is enthusiastic!

This is all about the llama staring at you meaningfully through the rearview mirror.

The ostrich is just a distraction for the murder that llama will perform

Carl

His tummy has the rumblies.

(via thunderous-dandelion)


ohaitharitsashley:

HAHAHAHAHAHA 😂😂😂😂

(via nectarinetangerine)